Category: Infection Control

NHSN Data Deadline for PY2020 QIP

NHSN has advised that NHSN data for July 1-September 30, 2018 must be submitted and corrected by December 31, 2018 in order to be applied to PY2020 QIP scores. NHSN recommends:

Contact the NHSN Helpdesk at nhsn@cdc.gov with subject line “Dialysis” if you have any questions.

The NHSN software was updated to Version 9.2 on December 8, 2018, with many additions and changes, including analysis updates. Please carefully review pages 1 and 7-8 of the Version 9.2 release notes at https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/nwrn.org/files/NHSN/NHSN9.2.pdf for important details about these changes. To use any of the new analysis output options you must first Regenerate Datasets. Send any questions to the NHSN Helpdesk at NHSN@cdc.gov.

Using the National Health and Safety Network (NHSN) as a Resource in your Infection Control Efforts.

Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are the second leading cause of death in dialysis patients according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Healthcare practitioners can prevent many of these infections by following basic infection guidelines (CDC Core Interventions) and tracking the results. The CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), the nation’s most widely used healthcare-associated infection tracking system, provides facilities, states, regions, and the nation with data needed to identify problem areas, measure progress of prevention efforts, and ultimately eliminate healthcare-associated infections. Visit the NHSN website for information on training, protocols, forms, support materials, resources and FAQs related to surveillance of BSI events, prevention measures, and vaccination information for facility staff members and patients.

Learn the Signs of Sepsis

According to the CDC, more than 1.5 million people in the United States get sepsis every year. More than 250, 000 Americans die of sepsis each year.  Sepsis is the body’s most extreme reaction to an infection. It is life-threatening, and should be considered a medical emergency. if it not treated in a timely manner and with the appropriate therapies it will lead to organ failure, tissue damage and possibly death.

Anyone can get an infection, and almost any infection can lead to sepsis. Some people are at higher risk of infection and sepsis, including:

  • Adults 65 or older
  • Immunosuppressed populations:
  • People who have chronic conditions
  • Children under one year

Taking the time to learn the symptoms of sepsis can save a life.

There is no single sign or symptom of sepsis. Early signs of sepsis involve a combination of symptoms that can include infection (suspected or confirmed) and* :

  • Confusion or disorientation (the patient that “just isn’t right”)
  • Shortness of breath
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Fever with or without uncontrollable chilling, “can’t get warm”
  • Extreme pain or discomfort
  • Clammy and sweating skin.
  • Patient will often voice that “something is wrong:”

*People with sepsis typically have more than one of these symptoms.

Any individual with this combination of symptoms requires an immediate assessment at an emergency department for evaluation and appropriate treatment. The required treatment cannot be provided in an outpatient ambulatory clinic.

For more resources for staff and patient education please visit the CDC website. https://www.cdc.gov.sepsis

Implementation of the CDC CORE Interventions Saves Lives

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports infection is the second most common cause of death and hospitalization among dialysis patients.  Hemodialysis patients have multiple and frequent exposure to healthcare environments undergoing treatment three times per week with direct access to their bloodstream via venipuncture and catheters.  Healthcare expenditures for these infections are staggering. Research has shown that the Implementation of the CDC core interventions reduces infections dramatically, saving lives and reducing healthcare costs.  Take a minute to review these interventions, by clicking here, to assure your facility is doing everything possible to be safe and save lives.