Category: Transplantation

NKF Spring Clinical Meetings, Boston

The National Kidney Foundation 2019 Spring Clinical Meetings (SCM19) present a unique opportunity for renal health care providers to learn new developments related to all aspects of nephrology. An important objective of SCM19 is to present the latest insights into CKD care through a combination of interesting courses, practical workshops, thought-provoking symposia and insightful debates. SCM19 will be held May 8-12, 2019 in Boston MA. In-person registration is allowed, but many registration fees are discounted if you register online before May 6.

Extra-cost pre-conference course topics on May 8 include dialysis success, vascular access, ultrasound, supportive care, and updates on new developments in transplant, critical care, and glomerular disease. Extra-cost lunch workshop topics will include vascular access, electrolytes, hyponatremia, glomerular disease, reproductive health, hypertension, communication, and board review. For those unable to attend in person, live-streamed conference sessions will be available on burnout, obesity, safety, fluid management, opioids, social media, diabetes, community, lifestyle interventions, palliative care, and KDOQI update.

For more information and registration, see https://www.kidney.org/spring-clinical.

January 2019 Learning and Action Network (LAN) Webinars

The ESRD National Coordinating Council will host four January webinars to introduce 2019 QIA projects, all to be held 3-4 PM EST.  Find more information and register at the links provided:

National QIA Webinars

The ESRD National Coordinating Council will host four January webinars to introduce 2019 QIA projects, all to be held at noon PST. Find more information and register at the links provided:

The Seven Step Journey Towards Kidney Transplant

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has incorporated in the 2018 transplant quality improvement activity (QIA) a series of standardized steps toward transplant. According to the 2012 Clinical Journal of American Society of Nephrology article, “Impact of Navigators on Completion of Steps in the Kidney Transplant Process: A Randomized, Controlled Trial,” these steps were first defined and performed in 23 hemodialysis facilities in Ohio. The steps are: (1) Suitability for Referral to Transplant Center; (2) Interest in Transplant; (3) Referral Call to Transplant Center; (4) First Visit to Transplant Center; (5) Transplant Center Workup; (6) Successful Transplant Candidate; (7) On Waiting List or Evaluating Potential Living Donor.

Research has identified that the guidance offered by a transplant navigator –or mentor- helps patients move further and faster through the seven steps than they would without a navigator. If you are interested in starting a Peer Mentorship Program at your facility, contact the Network.

Living Non-Related Transplant and Paired Kidney Exchange

According to the United Network for the Organ Sharing (UNOS) nationwide, more than 120,000 people are on the waiting list for an organ transplant as of May 2018. Many face a lengthy wait for an available organ. To spare an individual patient a long and uncertain wait, relatives, loved ones, friends, and even individuals who wish to remain anonymous may serve as living donors. About 6,000 transplants each year are made possible by living donors. Two types of non-related kidney donation are:
1.  Non-directed donation. With this type of donation the donor does not name the specific person to get the transplant. The match is arranged based on medical compatibility with a patient in need. Some non-directed donors choose never to meet their recipients. In other cases, the donor and recipient may meet at some time, if they both agree, and if the transplant center policy permits it.
2.  Paired kidney exchanges. This type of donation is becoming very common and an exciting option for kidney recipient and donor pairs who are not compatible with each other. Previously, people with kidney failure who had an incompatible donor were not able to benefit from the transplant being offered to them. However, paired kidney exchange programs are having a significant impact on the expanding options of living kidney transplants. Paired exchanges are now allowing transplants to occur between incompatible donor pairs and in a few unique ways.
There are many types of living kidney donations. The Network encourages dialysis facility staff to educate patients and care givers about transplant options and provide resources to help them make informed decisions.
For more information please visit:

Increasing Living Donation in the ESRD population

According to the Organ Procurement & Transplantation Network (OPTN), as of March 12, 2018, there are 95,357 people in the United States waiting for kidney transplants.   Every year five thousand of those people die awaiting a kidney transplant; the current average wait for a kidney transplant is 3.6 years due to the shortage of organs. Increasing living donation is a solution to the organ shortage. Living donation also has many benefits, which include: improved organ/graft survival, decreased need for antirejection medications, immediate organ function post-surgery, and immediate placement on the wait list for a deceased organ transplant as you await your living donor work up.

Unfortunately one of the most significant barriers to increasing living donation is the discomfort that patients feel discussing the topic of organ donation with friends and family.  The National Kidney Foundation has developed a campaign, “The Big Ask/The Big Give” to assist patients in understanding the benefits of living donation and prepare them for this discussion.  Reviewing these materials with patients in your facility who are considering transplant or on the wait list already may help them prepare for this difficult, yet potentially lifesaving conversation.

Materials are available at the NKF site at https://www.kidney.org/transplantation/livingdonors/how-to-make-the-ask in both English and Spanish.